Private Label Naming Gone Bad
Private Label Naming Gone Bad
 
 

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

Posted by Ryan

Filed Under: Business, Design

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2 Comments »

We talk a lot about brands that instantly communicate their promise in that split second at purchase.  Names, in particular, should be easy to understand, pronounce and quickly communicate what the product is or does.  However, people are driven by emotions, desires and tastes.

Foodtown’s private label packaging has adopted a simple descriptor system that allows them to ape the big brand competitors and steal share in the very competitive cereal category.   But . . . Crispy Hexagons, really?  Did the legal team name these?  Even the proudest geeks amongst us aren’t keen to nibble on anything called a Crispy Hexagon.  Any other examples you’ve seen of taking telegraphic too far?

 

 

 
 

Friday, June 28th, 2013

Posted by Michael

Filed Under: Business, Design

3 Comments »

In April this year, Budweiser unveiled an interesting new can design, which it says echoes the classic bowtie holding shape associated with the brand. We could debate the merits of the design until the cows come home, but the reaction outside of the design community can be summed up by the first result on Google for the search “Budweiser can”: Budweiser’s New Pitch: Less Beer, Pay More

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Monday, June 17th, 2013

Posted by Loren

Filed Under: Creativity, Design, Human Connection

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1 Comment »

 

Walking down the aisle the other day and saw this design that really caught my attention. The stark, clean design is very appealing and channels the aesthetic of the Scandinavian region from which the founder is from.

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Friday, June 14th, 2013

Posted by Anthony

Filed Under: Business, Creativity, Design

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Its like Beardwood Invaded Duane Reade this week!

I was out shopping for personal care items at my local Duane Reade when I suddenly became aware of just how many Beardwood designs are in the aisles of this quintessential NYC Pharmacy. With shelf space at such a premium in NYC retailers, I was really impressed at how many facings our products received. From Dish Soap to Cold Medicines, Deodorant to Haircare… we are even in the Beer case! And there’s many more products soon to join these on the shelves.

Once the last few old ZICAM packs go... this lineup will really say "POW!"

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Monday, June 10th, 2013

Posted by Loren

Filed Under: Creativity, Lifestyle, Pop Culture

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I had the opportunity to attend a fun record label 12 year anniversary party. DFA Records threw a party in the lavish Grand Prospect Hall usually reserved for fancy occasions like weddings.

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Monday, June 10th, 2013

Posted by Loren

Filed Under: Art, Design, Lifestyle

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I am always impressed by destination branding done right. It seems like a lot of tourism logos get lost in a sea of meaningless swirls, suns and flags. To capture the true essence of what makes a place special and do it in a unique and conceptually rich way is quite tricky. Below are a few of my favorite that seem to have done it right.

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Friday, June 7th, 2013

Posted by Sarah

Filed Under: Business, Creativity, Design, Global, Human Connection

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IDEO has launched their semi-annual design review, Designs On—. This issue focuses on packaging, and past topics have included birth, global warming, and time. While the work is theoretical, it is free to explore the topics that concern us most with simple, clever, and thought provoking solutions— design at its most “human”. The chopsticks packaging design featured above, was developed by Gregory Perez and Guoning Hu as a reminder of the environmental effects of the 45 billion pairs of disposable chopsticks consumed in China every year.

 

 
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We are lucky enough to be located next door to a couple of photographer & graffiti artist JR’s iconic pieces. Starting out in the grimier side of Paris, his work focuses on the cracks in society and giving a face to the people and issues that can be easy to ignore. The physical scale of each piece is dramatic and unexpected, but always compellingly human. He’s taken on a much larger global ambitions, supported by TED— bringing identity to major social issues in Haiti, Tunisia, North Dakota, and beyond… Catch this documentary on his work on HBO.

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Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

Posted by Andrew

Filed Under: Art, Design, Pop Culture

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3 Comments »

Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

One of most influential of all the rock-subgenres, Punk’s DIY ethics, deconstructed instrumentation, and often maliciously vulgar lyrics sewed the seeds for countless styles of music since mid 70′s. Opened this past weekend at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, PUNK: Chaos to Couture showcases a collection of Punk-inspired high fashion from famed design houses such as Versace, Givenchy, and Alexander McQueen.

Museum patrons looking into the exhibit online will most likely find negative reviews. The standard critique seems to be the exhibit’s inability to truly infuse the DIY aesthetic, working class roots, and anti-establishment values into such an elitist and unobtainable art form such as high fashion.

Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

I was able to visit the exhibit this weekend and I can truly say that I don’t find fault with the concept. I feel that the strangest, most jarring mergers of aesthetics and values can yield some of the most inspired and original work, whether it being music, fashion, or design.

However, walking in with more knowledge of Punk bands than I do of fashion, I was let down with the exhibit’s failure to truly portray the history of Punk through its supporting visuals or any kind of music. Even while the opening room was dedicated to showcasing “real” Punk fashion, true historical examples were condemned to dark corners and reproductions of famous locales (most notably CBGB’s bathroom) were suspiciously clean. While each subsequent room was dedicated and inspired by a different punk aesthetic, none of them truly captured the filth, vandalism, and general disregard that Punk domains became famous for.

Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Authenticity aside, I was taken back by how extravagant and well crafted the garments were. Even breastplates made of broken dishes, and gowns constructed of Tyvek shipping wrap were welded, sewn, and fused with the greatest of detail. Dresses made of garbage bags and their contents exploited the textures of found materials. Explosions of color, safety pins, and studs highlighted DIY inspired details.

Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Overall, I thought the exhibit succeeded as an exercise in fantasy and should be a good introduction to those unfamiliar with Punk. The attire on exhibit was exciting and thought provoking, even if the Punk inspirations were vague and at times, cliché. If you wish to dive a bit deeper into Punk, I would highly recommend a trip downtown to the East Village and stop in the crust infested bars, clothing shops, and record stores. It may have cleaned up since its heyday, but a good eye and some research will reveal a fantastic story. If you can’t make the trip, you should check out Beardwood&Co.’s work with CBGB found here: Featured Work

Finally, check out the exhibit here:
PUNK: Chaos to Couture

 

 
Beauty is Embarrassing by Wayne White
 
 

Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

Posted by Sarah

Filed Under: Art, Creativity, Design, Pop Culture, Typography

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Wayne White has a way with words. You may recognized his iconic paintings that incorporate humorous, abstract, and low-brow phrases into vintage landscape paintings— a master of making you laugh, think, and question your existence all in one satisfying moment. Although this may be his most recognizable work, his roots in art run deep. A recent documentary called “Beauty is Embarrassing”, reveals an incredible body of work. Painting, sculpture, puppetry, set design, and animation— White left no form of creativity untouched. His work permeated pop culture on TV in the 1980′s— and was the brilliant mind behind Peter Gabriel’s “Big Time” video, the sets and puppets of PeeWee’s Playhouse, and much more.